Schrödinger's Kitten

Irreverent Science for Everyone

Friday 22 April 2016

Scientist Or Not, Silly Names Float Everyone's Boat

  • policy
  • names
  • globalwarming

There is currently sadness across Britain, as the public are told that their naming choices are not serious enough for science. But working scientists do far worse themselves. Projects to explore the depths of the universe and the essence of the universe revel in titles like ‘WiggleZ’ and ‘GiggleZ’. The vast public support for ‘Boaty McBoatface’ shows that scientists and normal people share some priorities, and gives hope that one day the two species may be able to communicate, or even coexist.

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Friday 19 February 2016

How I fail to make Jelly

  • micro
  • mywork
  • materials

Every day, I try and make shape-changing jelly. Every day, my jelly does not work in new and different ways. I am not really sure why it is not working, and every failure opens more questions and variables. I am eating quite a lot of biscuits.

I hadn’t really internalised this aspect of a PhD. I was told they were hard, but I guess I thought that meant long hours. I’m not working long hours at the moment. I don't have enough ideas to fill them.

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Tuesday 13 October 2015

Between Natural Selection and Randomness: a Nearly Neutral Path to Genetic Diversity

  • policy
  • micro
  • women

For Lovelace day 2015: Professor Tomoko Ohta, the proposer of the 'nearly neutral' model of genetic drift. This important modification to earlier theories describes the effect of random changes in the genome on the evolutionary direction of a species. Her work has implications for the speed of evolution in small populations (such as those being created scarily rapidly by ecological damage, for example) and to estimate how long it takes species to diverge from each other. This year, she received the Crafoord prize, one of the world’s biggest scientific prizes, from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences this year for her life’s work.

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Curiosity Thrilled The Cat: How I Decided What To Work On

  • policy
  • micro
  • women
  • my-work

How did I end up working in nanotechnology and smart materials? This is a surprisingly difficult question, and for some reason involved three years as a writer. However, I’ve done some research (by which I mean I called my mum) and I have deduced the following:

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Molecular Curl Girl

(Original 2011/10/13 / Updated 2015/10/13 — see below)

Think of science things. Newton's laws, Celsius' degrees, Maxwell's distributions, Hertzsprung and Russell's diagram, Chandrasekhar's limit, fermi's -ons... You know you've made it in science when you get something named after you. Which is why I particularly want to big up the lady I'm talking about today1, because she did some ubiquitous work and noone's even heard of her, let alone tagged her name to her invention. Which is... duh duh duh!

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Sunday 26 April 2015

My First Ultrasonic Trapping Device

  • macro
  • mywork
  • waves

In my ongoing studies of making Small Shit That Does Shit™ (AKA functional nanomaterials) I have created a device that uses shaped, high frequency soundwaves to move around things a micrometer across (0.001 millimetres) without touching them. You could call it an audio-vibratory, physio-molecular transport device.

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The Path of Research Never Did Run Smooth

  • practical
  • macro

In the interests of presenting a more accurate picture of the genuine process of research, here is a fairly comprehensive list of things that did not go to plan in the first mini-research project I and partner undertook:

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Tuesday 14 October 2014

Madame Wu: Breaking Parity, Demonstrating Equality

  • quantum
  • women

(Originally posted 24 March 2010)

It's Ada Lovelace day! Time to draw attention to women in science — often ignored, never deservedly. My chosen lady is:

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Monday 22 September 2014

What I Did In My Three Years As Engineering-Cheerleader-In-Chief

  • personal
  • macro

I just came to the end of three years as the communications, events and marketing manager for UCL Engineering — 11 departments, 1,000 staff, and 3,500 students, working on things ranging from testing new biofuels to spotting browser insecurities. I did a lot of things for UCL Engineering, including writing about their discoveries and projects, taking photos, editing films, working out sponsorship, and commissioning merchandise. A few highlights...

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Tuesday 10 December 2013

London Cryptofestival, 2013

  • practical
  • policy
  • security
  • computing

It’s a Saturday and I’m heading to a conference. I’m late, because it’s a Saturday. But I’m going to sit in a lecture theatre in my free time because it’s London Cryptofestival.

Billed as ‘coming together [...] to reclaim our right to communicate and experiment on the internet’, this independent, DIY event is aimed at both the usual security conscious techheads and non-experts just interested in the possibilities of, and threats to, privacy online. Given numerous recent revelations about the NSA and GCHQ’s work, as well as an increasing amount of our lives being documented online, I was up for that. I might even get to meet some people I could share my new PGP key with.1

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Content: Scary Boots — Design: Canis Lupus